The Barbed Wire - July 1, 2022

June 28, 2022
RCRC Barbed Wire Will Return in August
Registration Now Open for RCRC’s 2022 Annual Meeting in Napa County
RCRC Launches Sixth Annual Rural County Photo Contest
Bill of the Week: SB 54 (Allen) - Transformative Single Use Packaging Legislation Adopted by California Legislature
RCRC’s Rural Rundown of the 2022-23 State Budget
RCRC Helps Stop Major Legislation That Would Have Opened the Door for Even More CEQA Litigation
Update on Senate Bill 443 (Hertzberg) – Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
Legislature Passes Bill Usurping Local Permitting for Energy and Manufacturing Projects
Bill Limiting Electrical Utility Liability for Vegetation Management Nears Finish Line
CPUC Approves PG&E’s Regionalization Proposal to Improve Safety Performance, Responsiveness to Local Communities
White House Announces New Pay Raises for Wildland Firefighter Workforce
Amendment to Help Law Enforcement Fight Illegal Marijuana Grows
Marijuana Legislation Update
RCRC AFFILIATE ENTITIES
BULLETIN BOARD
KEEPING UP
IN THE NEWS
LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

RCRC Barbed Wire Will Return in August

The Barbed Wire will be on hiatus through the end of resuming on Friday, August 5, 2022. Enjoy the summer break. The California Legislature will be on summer recess through July, returning on August 1, 2022.  

Registration Now Open for RCRC’s 2022 Annual Meeting in Napa County

Registration is now open for RCRC’s 2022 Annual Meeting!  The conference will be held September 14 –16, 2022 at the Napa Valley Marriott Hotel and Spa in Napa County.  This year’s program will feature experts discussing a wide range of topics on critical issues shaping California’s future. Don’t wait - Register today to receive the “Early Bird” rate! 

RCRC Launches Sixth Annual Rural County Photo Contest

RCRC is holding its Sixth Annual Rural County Photo Contest from July 1 through July 31, 2022.  The contest invites individuals to submit their photographs capturing life in rural California and showcasing the beautiful scenery, activities, communities, history, and charm of RCRC’s 39 member counties.

Photo entries should be sent to photocontest@rcrcnet.org. All entries must be received by 11:59 p.m. on July 31, 2022, be the original work of the submitter, and must include:

  • Location where the photo was taken, including the county in which it was taken; and
  • Photographer’s full name and email address.

The grand prize winner will receive a $100 gift card, and the winning photograph will be unveiled at the September RCRC Board of Directors Meeting.  Full contest details are available on the RCRC website at www.rcrcnet.org/photo-contest. See the full press release and contest flyer here.

Bill of the Week: SB 54 (Allen) - Transformative Single Use Packaging Legislation Adopted by California Legislature

On Thursday, the Legislature sent a transformative piece of recycling legislation to the Governor for action.  SB 54 (Allen) requires manufacturers of single use packaging and food service ware to take responsibility for the management and recycling of the products they introduce into the stream of commerce.   

SB 54 marks a tremendous paradigm shift for solid waste management in California, where local governments have traditionally borne the full responsibility for achieving the state’s solid waste management and recycling directives.   

In particular, SB 54 requires single use packaging manufacturers to ensure that covered material is recyclable or compostable, create and fund end markets, and bear responsibility for costs incurred by local agencies and recycling service providers associated with the collection, storage, handling, and marketing of those products.  The measure is clear that the Legislature intends to ensure that local jurisdictions will be made financially whole for any new costs incurred associated with the measure. 

Once CalRecycle determines what covered material is recyclable or compostable, local recycling programs will be required to accept those materials, unless they receive an exemption or extension from CalRecycle for certain situations.  The 19 California counties with fewer than 70,000 residents (and cities within those counties) may exempt themselves from this requirement. 

As part of the measure, manufacturers of single use plastic packaging must pay $500 million annually to the state through 2034 to fund a host of state and local plastic pollution monitoring, reduction, and mitigation measures, with large set asides dedicated to providing benefits to residents living in a disadvantaged community, low-income community, or rural area.  Local jurisdictions, tribes, NGOs, and community-based organizations will be eligible for grant funding. 

Local governments and solid waste haulers have obtained assurances from the author and key legislators to work minor, but important revisions to SB 54 into a clean-up bill in August once legislators return from summer break. 

RCRC worked closely with Cal Cities and CSAC to help steer the legislation to ensure that it would not impose new costs on local governments and turn into another experience like the SB 1383 organic recycling program.  RCRC’s joint letter of support can be found here

SB 54 was an attempt by the Legislature to find an alternative to the single-use plastics initiative that will be on the November 2022 ballot.  The initiative’s supporters have indicated they will withdraw their measure if SB 54 is signed into law. 

For more information, contact RCRC Policy Advocate John Kennedy

RCRC’s Rural Rundown of the 2022-23 State Budget

On June 30, 2022 Governor Newsom signed the 2022-23 State Budget. As expected, by 10:30 p.m. on Wednesday June 29, 2022, the Legislature passed the array of bills that make up the $308 billion budget agreement. The Administration, the Senate, and the Assembly leadership reached “the deal” over the weekend of June 25th, paving the way for the Legislature to send the Governor an amended Budget Bill plus a host of budget trailer bills prior to the start of the 2022-23 fiscal year, July 1st. The Rural Rundown captures highlights of the budget package as it relates to RCRC member counties. 

Although the bills signed on June 30th conclude much of the budget conversation, there is more to be done. When they return in August, the Legislature will be developing the details around energy, wildfire, and drought funding.

Also of note, the potential $25 million being made available for Williamson Act in earlier iterations of the budget was, regrettably, redirected to the Sustainable Agricultural Land Conservation program.

The budget agreement includes a number of high-profile items, such as:

  • $9.5 billion in direct refunds to income tax filers with incomes up to $250,000 for single filers and $500,000 for joint filers.
  • $47 billion for infrastructure over four years, including, $550 million for broadband and $150 million for libraries.
  • An increase of 15 percent for TK-12 school funding.
  • $1.3 billion in retention stipends for health care workers.

The Rural Rundown captures some of the other budget highlights of particular interest to RCRC member counties. Read it here.

RCRC Helps Stop Major Legislation That Would Have Opened the Door for Even More CEQA Litigation

In June, RCRC helped stop several bills that would have significantly increased the complexity, ambiguity, and inherent litigation risk associated with the California Environmental Quality Act.   

AB 1001 (C. Garcia) and SB 33 (Cortese) failed to advance out of policy committees in the second house by the constitutional deadlines and so are effectively dead.   

Assembly Bill 1001 would have greatly restricted the areas in which a project could mitigate air quality impacts on disadvantaged communities and jeopardized a local agency’s ability to adopt statements of overriding considerations in those circumstances.  The bill would have also increased ambiguity and litigation risk by requiring lead agencies to give consideration to the principles of environmental justice as part of the CEQA review process.  RCRC supported the author’s underlying goals and worked with other local agencies to suggest extensive modifications to achieve those goals in a way that didn’t increase CEQA complexity or expand litigation risk.  Those suggestions were ultimately rejected by the author.  RCRC’s coalition letter can be found here

Senate Bill 33 was a very late gut and amend that would have indefinitely extended the statute of limitations for CEQA litigation for even innocent and non-prejudicial procedural oversights in failing to provide notices to those individuals who request them.  The bill would have also imposed an even greater burden on local governments to provide “concierge” notifications that are unnecessary and duplicative in light of existing posting procedures.   RCRC and CSAC strongly opposed the measure along with the California Building Industry Association.  Ultimately, SB 33 failed to secure a hearing in the Assembly Natural Resources Committee. 

Earlier this year, RCRC and other local government organizations helped to stop Senate Bill 1404 (Stern), which would have made CEQA even more unwieldly and litigious for projects involving the removal of oak trees.    

For more information, contact RCRC Policy Advocate John Kennedy

Update on Senate Bill 443 (Hertzberg) – Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

RCRC, along with a coalition of county and medical service partners, advocated strongly against Senate Bill 443, authored by Senator Robert Hertzberg. On June 28th, the bill was pulled by the author in the Assembly Health Committee, effectively “killing” the measure for this Session. 

SB 443 purported to clarify SB 438, another Senator Hertzberg measure from 2019, that dealt with the operation of public safety answering points (PSAPs), including 9-1-1 Emergency Medical Services (EMS) dispatch centers. On the contrary, the measure did not address local EMS dispatch issues but instead undermined county and LEMSA control of their EMS systems. SB 443 sought to undermine nearly 40 years of litigation that has affirmed county responsibility for their local emergency medical services systems  

Joining RCRC in opposition was the California State Association of Counties (CSAC), Urban Counties of California (UCC), County Health Executives Association of California (CHEAC), Emergency Medical Services Administrators Association of California (EMSAAC), and the Emergency Medical Service Medical Directors Association of California (EMDAC), as well as 20 individual counties. The high level of county opposition and engagement was key to the success of getting the bill pulled. Thank you to all the counties that engaged on this issue.  

For questions, please contact Policy Advocate Sarah Dukett.

Legislature Passes Bill Usurping Local Permitting for Energy and Manufacturing Projects

Late Wednesday night, the Legislature passed AB 205 (Budget), the budget trailer bill related to energy.  Among other things, the bill creates a new process for developers to site renewable energy, energy storage, transmission, and manufacturing through the California Energy Commission, thereby bypassing the local permitting process entirely. 

RCRC joined CSAC and Cal Cities in strongly opposing AB 205, as it is overly broad in usurping local control; excludes local governments from meaningful involvement in major development projects within their jurisdictions; and could result in even more litigation.  RCRC appreciates the letters in opposition sent by several of RCRC’s counties, including Glenn, Monterey, Napa, Nevada, Santa Barbara, Solano, and Tulare Counties. 

The opt-in permitting process may be utilized for solar and terrestrial wind larger than 50MW, energy storage facilities over 200MW, renewable energy manufacturing facilities, and transmission lines.   

Unfortunately, AB 205 misses the mark, as solar facilities will not help the state fix its reliability problems.  It is similarly unclear why major renewable energy manufacturing facilities with over $250 million in investments need such a permitting process.   

While the CEC permitting process is deferential to the input of the Coastal Commission and State Lands Commission for projects within their jurisdictions, there is no similar level of deference or process for input by the local governments where the projects will be sited. 

Among other things, AB 205: 

  • Provides financial assistance to utility customers with past due bills; 

  • Repeals the existing $10/month cap on fixed charges that can be imposed on investor-owned utility customers; 

  • Establishes a long duration energy storage financial incentive program, which excludes pumped storage projects; and 

  • Invests the Department of Water Resources with broad new power to procure or finance electricity to support grid reliability, including streamlined permitting of those projects.

For more information, contact RCRC Policy Advocate John Kennedy

Bill Limiting Electrical Utility Liability for Vegetation Management Nears Finish Line

Senate Bill 396 (Bradford, D-Inglewood) seeks to limit utility liability for entering onto a landowner’s property and performing vegetation management work to reduce the risk of trees coming into contact with power lines. This measure is sponsored by PG&E. 

Specifically, the bill exempts utilities from liability for trespass or damages for entering onto private land and felling, cutting, or trimming trees or vegetation as part of its efforts to maintain clearances around power lines, provided the utility first provides the landowner a notice and opportunity to be heard.   

Upon timely request by the landowner, the bill requires utilities to chip or remove felled trees, except for those within a utility easement, where the landowner grants express permission, or where the wood is not safely accessible by its vehicles and equipment.  In previous filings with the CPUC, PG&E indicated that it has equipment capable of chipping trees up to 28” in diameter.  Except within 150’ of a structure, road, or infrastructure, utilities must limit woody material treated to a maximum depth of nine inches. 

The bill also requires the CPUC to develop standardized content and methods of delivery for notifications that are reasonable expected to inform landowners of the work to be performed and determine the process for hearing landowner disputes.   

Amendments adopted on June 30: 1) change the author from Senator Brian Dahle to Senator Steven Bradford; 2) clarify that the bill is not intended to exempt a utility from liability for personal injury or property damage resulting from the utility’s negligence or recklessness in felling, cutting, or trimming trees or vegetation; 3) remove a provision allowing the landowner to determine whether material is chipped or hauled off-site; and 4) replace a clear prohibition on passing costs onto landowners with  legislative intent language that is not binding on the Public Utilities Commission. 

RCRC has extensively engaged on this bill and strongly opposed previous versions.  While many of RCRC’s suggestions to protect due process rights, avoid increasing wildfire risks, and clarify liability have been incorporated into the bill, significant issues remain.  The latest amendments undercut many of those hard-fought changes. RCRC will reevaluate the bill in light of the June 30 amendments, but will likely remain opposed to the measure. 

SB 396 sits on the Assembly Floor and awaits consideration when the Legislature reconvenes in August after summer break.   

For more information, contact RCRC Policy Advocate John Kennedy

CPUC Approves PG&E’s Regionalization Proposal to Improve Safety Performance, Responsiveness to Local Communities

Last week, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) approved PG&E’s Regionalization Plan that divides PG&E’s service area into five different regions. “The CPUC’s bankruptcy decision required regional restructuring so that PG&E would be more present in the community and better able to serve the diverse values and needs of its customers,” noted CPUC Commissioner Clifford Rechtschaffen.  Each region will have its own Risk Officer and Safety Officer as well as Regional Executive Officers that will manage each region while reporting directly to PG&E’s CEO. The five regions are the 1) North Coast, 2) North Valley & Sierra, 3) Bay Area, 4) South Bay & Central Coast, and 5) Central Valley. A map can be viewed here. For more information, see here.  

White House Announces New Pay Raises for Wildland Firefighter Workforce

Last week, the White House announced it is implementing a new set of pay increases that deliver retroactive pay increases to federal wildland firefighters, and improves recruitment and retention. Pay raises for federal firefighters had been included in the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL), but had been held up as federal agencies studied recruitment and retention data to decide where to deliver the pay raises. The legislation stipulated that the $600 million in the BIL to increase pay for wildland firefighters should go to all wildland firefighters provided that they are “located within a specified geographic area in which it is difficult to recruit or retain a federal wildland firefighter.” Ultimately, the Biden Administration decided to raise pay for all federal wildland firefighters over the next two years. 

In addition to the pay increases, the Administration announced a new Wildland Fire Management occupational series created by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, as well as a new initiative to support the mental health of federal firefighters.  

Amendment to Help Law Enforcement Fight Illegal Marijuana Grows

During a House Appropriations Committee Markup on Tuesday, Representative Mike Garcia (R- R-Palmdale) proposed an amendment to end the $19,000 overtime cap for law enforcement for fiscal year 2023. According to Garcia, “fighting illegal marijuana grows is a tall task, and many of our law enforcement spend hours past their shifts fighting against these grows.” The amendment passed with bipartisan support through the committee.

Marijuana Legislation Update

As part of ongoing negotiations regarding the America COMPETES Act/ United States Innovation and Competition Act (USICA) conference committee report, it was announced last week that the Secure and Fair Enforcement (SAFE) Banking Act would not be included in the final agreement. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-New York) has previously shown resistance to moving the narrow financial reform ahead of broader justice-focused cannabis legalization. Conversely, it is looking less likely that Senator Schumer will have the votes to pass his broader justice-focused cannabis legalization.

RCRC AFFILIATE ENTITIES

A monthly update regarding the important work of RCRC's affiliated entities, providing innovative services for the benefit of rural communities.

 

ESJPA Welcomes New Member Solano County, Reviews Draft Business Plan 

The Rural Counties’ Environmental Joint Powers Authority (ESJPA) recently expanded to 26 member counties with the addition of Solano County as its newest member. Supervisor Mitch Mashburn will serve as the delegate on the ESJPA board representing the County. Solano, which joined RCRC earlier this year, joins the ESJPA as our focus intensifies on assisting member jurisdictions with implementation of organics regulations in accordance with Senate Bill 1383 (Lara, 2016). The regulations, which will impact all residents and businesses in California, require separation of organic food waste and recovery of edible foods to help reduce emissions of methane, a harmful short-lived climate pollutant. While the regulations are complex, ESJPA is committed to helping ensure that its members are equipped to implement the program to the maximum extent feasible in our rural communities. 

The ESJPA Board of Directors also got its first look at a draft Business Plan which will set the course for the ESJPA’s development and potential expansion over the next two years. The board provided constructive feedback on the first draft of the plan, which included options to explore additional ESJPA member services and strategies to secure the fiscal solvency of the organization. The Business Plan is on schedule for final board approval at the October ESJPA meeting. 

 

GSNR Showcases Forest Resiliency Plans at Wildland Fire Meeting in the Central Sierra 

Last week, Golden State Natural Resources (GSNR) leadership attended the Wildland Fire Successes, Challenges and Solutions event in the Central Sierra event in El Dorado County.  

Over the course of three days, private, local, tribal, state, and federal stakeholders convened for a shared learning experience to showcase the successful results of a collaborative approach to wildland fire issues in the Central Sierras and to develop local solutions that contribute to increasing progress. The event included a tour of forest lands where fire adaptive approaches have occurred and a demonstration of a new wildfire water delivery system. The overwhelming theme of the event was the need for proactive forest management at landscape scale to promote forest and watershed health, and fire survival. 

GSNR Vice President Kevin Cann, along with GSNR partner, Claren Nilsson of Lost River Fire Management, both presented to the attendees. Ms. Nilsson emphasized the importance of forest stewardship and collaboration. Mr. Cann provided an update on GSNR’s forest resiliency project, emphasizing the benefits of alliances among the individual groups. The Project was favorably received by the federal, state, and private partners in attendance as one piece of the solution puzzle. 

The event was organized by the National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy.  GSNR and RCRC jointly served as one of the hosts. The event was attended by over 70 fire professionals both in person and virtually.  

To learn more about GSNR and its forest resiliency projects visit www.goldenstatenaturalresources.com 

 

Golden State Finance Authority Conducts First County Webinars for Assist-to-Own Program 

In June, Golden State Finance Authority (GSFA) conducted the first in a series of informational webinars regarding the new Assist-to-Own program, which provides county employees in GSFA member counties with homeowners' assistance for the purchase or refinance of a home in California. 

These webinars included two sessions for Monterey County, and one for Tehama County. A Board Supervisor for each county provided an opening introduction at the sessions, with Supervisor Chris Lopez opening the Monterey County webinars and Supervisor Bob Williams opening the Tehama County webinar. During the webinars GSFA staff provided county employees with an overview of the program, the potential benefits, and the necessary qualifications to apply. Attendees were also given the opportunity to ask detailed questions.  

The webinars were well attended, with Monterey County in particular experiencing total attendance of approximately 500 employees. The webinars were recorded so that they can be shared out by each county to employees who may have been unable to attend. Monterey is planning to hold a third employee webinar in early July. Additional webinars are scheduled for other GSFA member counties in the coming months, with that number expected to increase.  

These informational webinars are one way that GSFA is partnering with its member counties to spread the word to employees about the “Assist-to-Own” program. For additional information regarding “Assist-to-Own” and GSFA, visit www.gsfahome.org or call (855)740-8422. Counties interested in working with GSFA to market the program to their employees, including setting up an individualized webinar for their county, should contact Carolyn Jhajj at cjhajj@rcrcnet.org.

BULLETIN BOARD

Announcements regarding hearings, grants, and public comment notices of importance to California's rural counties.

 

California Water Plan Public Workshop - Climate Change

The California Water Plan will be holding a virtual public workshop on Monday, July 11 to provide details on the science, tools and processes that DWR has been developing and applying for climate resilience. The workshop will help attendees understand how DWR’s work can support local and regional water resource-related climate adaptation efforts. The workshop will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and will be organized into three parts (each approx. 2 hours long): Setting the Stage, Future Conditions, and How We Respond. For more information, see here.

Date:  Monday, July 11, 2022
Time: 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM, organized into 3 parts (see above)
Register Here

 

Grant Funding Opportunity - Wildfire Recovery and Forest Resilience Directed Grant Program

The Sierra Nevada Conservancy has launched the second cycle of its $50 million Wildfire Recovery and Forest Resilience Directed Grant Program.

Last year, the California State Budget appropriated $50 million to the Sierra Nevada Conservancy (SNC) to address wildfire- and forest-resilience priorities. In June, SNC made awards totaling $21 million to forest resilience and wildfire recovery projects and approved guidelines for up to an additional $23,700,000 in local-assistance grants next fiscal year.

To be eligible for the $23 million in funding, applicants must be a public agency, nonprofit organization, or a tribal entity. Projects must be located within, or provide services to, the Sierra Nevada Region as defined by SNC governing legislation—an area including the mountains and foothills of Sierra Nevada range, much of California’s Cascade range, the Mono Basin, Owens Valley, and parts of the Klamath Mountains.

Concept proposals must be submitted by July 29, 2022. If invited, full proposals will be due October 28, 2022, and project awards will begin in March 2023. Projects must be completed by January 1, 2028.

Applicants interested in submitting a concept proposal must first discuss the idea with an SNC Area Representative.

 

Grant Funding Opportunity - America the Beautiful Challenge

The America the Beautiful Challenge is a public-private grant program for locally led ecosystem restoration projects that invest in watershed restoration, resilience, equitable access, workforce development, corridors and connectivity, and collaborative conservation, consistent with the America the Beautiful Initiative. 

The America the Beautiful Challenge will seek to advance conservation and restoration projects that are consistent with the principles outlined in the Conserving and Restoring America the Beautiful report and that focus on at least one of the following core areas of need:

  • Conserving and restoring rivers, coasts, wetlands, and watersheds
  • Conserving and restoring forests, grasslands, and other important ecosystems that serve as carbon sinks
  • Connecting and reconnecting wildlife corridors, large landscapes, watersheds, and seascapes
  • Improving ecosystem and community resilience to coastal flooding, drought, and other climate-related threats
  • Expanding access to the outdoors, particularly in underserved communities

Applicants are encouraged to develop large landscape scale and/or cross jurisdictional projects that advance existing conservation plans or are informed by Indigenous Traditional Knowledge.

America the Beautiful Challenge proposals are due July 21, 2022. The full Request for Proposals can be found here: https://www.nfwf.org/programs/america-beautiful-challenge/america-beautiful-challenge-2022-request-proposals

 

Yolo Land Trust Seeks Executive Director

The Yolo Land Trust Executive Director provides leadership toward the development and fulfillment of the Yolo Land Trust’s (YLT) mission of conserving farmland in Yolo County through the implementation of YLT’s strategic plan and the achievement of annual goals and objectives set by the Board of Directors. The successful candidate will lead and manage all functions of the organization including financial oversight, budget development and management, conservation easement transactions, stewardship of the conservation portfolio (including the YLT-owned farm), donor stewardship and development, and external communications. Applications are due Monday, July 18, 2022, by 5:00 PM PDT. Details about this opportunity are available here.

 

Career Opportunity in Plumas County

The County of Plumas seeks a County Administrative Officer.  The CAO is a contracted, at-will position both appointed by and accountable to the Board of Supervisors and is responsible for enforcement of all County codes, ordinances and regulations, the conduct of all financial activities, and the efficient and economical performance of the County’s operations.  For additional information and to view the job posting click here.

 

Del Norte County Seeks Deputy Director for the Community Development Department (Public Works Branch)

Del Norte County seeks a Deputy Director for the Community Development Department - Public Works Branch. This position has branch level administrative responsibility of the department (Public Works Branch), including a variety of contract management and intra- and inter-agency coordination activities under general direction of the Community Development Department Director. Under an administrative team concept, plans, organizes, coordinates and directs work of personnel in the Public Works Branch which includes the Engineering and Surveying Division, Roads Division, County Service Area (sewer collection system), and Flood Control District. Additional information is available here, or view details and apply online.

 

Institute for Local Government Launches New Digital Planning Commissioner Handbook & Regional Trainings

The Institute for Local Government (ILG) recently released an updated version of their Planning Commissioners Handbook. This handbook is designed to support planning commissioners, their staff, and other officials interested in land use and planning; to help local officials understand the planning process; and provide a glimpse of some potential planning challenges commissioners may experience during their terms. The handbook describes the major terms, plans, and policies that make up the framework of local planning, as well as typical stakeholders in the process and the basics of reviewing applications for development.

In conjunction with this release, ILG is hosting regional training sessions for planning commissioners. These interactive sessions will take place in person at various locations throughout the state and will cover topics such as the role of a planning commission, how to work effectively with staff and the governing board, effective community engagement, CEQA basics, required planning documents, and local and regional planning challenges and opportunities. Each session will give participants the opportunity to engage with experts in the field and fellow planning commissioners to hear best practices, emerging trends, and lessons learned. All sessions are FREE but space is limited and registration is required. Find a full schedule and register here.

Next training: Santa Cruz, San Benito & Monterey Counties - July 22, 2022 - Planning Commissioner Training

 

Access the State Grants Portal for a Multitude of Funding Opportunities

Billions of dollars are up for grabs to public agencies and other entities, including tribes and businesses. Grant seekers can access a centralized portal of grant and loan opportunities here, or sign up to receive new grant opportunities delivered straight to your inbox.

KEEPING UP

Announcements regarding key staffing changes of importance to California's rural counties.

 

 

 

Monika Giebitz, of Auburn, has been appointed Deputy Director of Legislation at the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, where she has been Chief of Legislation since 2013. Giebitz was a Legislative Analyst at the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection from 2009 to 2013 and 2005 to 2008 and a Staff Services Analyst at the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services from 2008 to 2009. Giebitz earned a Master of Arts degree in English from California State University, Sacramento. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $140,244. Giebitz is registered without party preference.

Jignesh “Jig” Patel, of Roseville, has been appointed to the State Board of Pharmacy, where he has served since 2020. Patel has been a Division Pharmacy Manager for Safeway NorCal Division since 2006, where he has held several positions since 1999, including Pharmacy Manager, Pharmacist, Intern and Technician. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Patel is a Democrat.

Gavin Payne, of San Luis Obispo, has been reappointed to the California Cradle-to-Career Data System Governing Board, where he has served since 2021. Payne has been Principal at GPC Advisors LLC, since 2016. He was Director of United States Policy, Advocacy and Communications at Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation from 2013 to 2016. Payne was Chief Deputy State Superintendent of Public Instruction at the Department of Education from 2003 to 2010. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no compensation. Payne is a Democrat.

Karen Relucio, of Napa, has been reappointed to the Commission on Emergency Medical Services, where she has served since 2019. Relucio has been Public Health Officer and Deputy Director at the Napa County Health and Human Services Agency since 2015. She held several positions at the San Mateo County Health System between 2006 and 2015 including Assistant Health Officer and Medical Director at the Public Health Clinics, STD/HIV Program and Medical Director of the Public Health Emergency Preparedness Program. Relucio is President of the Health Officers Association of California and a member of the Napa Solano Medical Society Board of Directors. Relucio is a member of the California Conference of Local Health Officers, where she served as President from 2019 to 2021. She earned a Doctor of Medicine degree from Rush University Medical College. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no compensation. Relucio is a Democrat.

Tony Tavares, of Elk Grove, has been appointed as Director of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). Tavares has been District 7 Director of the California Department of Transportation since 2020, where he has served in several positions since 1997, including District 4 Director, Chief of the Division of Maintenance, Chief of the Division of Right of Way and Land Surveys, and Assistant Division Chief of Construction. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $209,100. Tavares is a Democrat.

Kelly Welchans, of Davis, has been appointed Chief Counsel at the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. Welchans has been a Deputy Attorney General in the Natural Resources Law Section at the Office of the California Attorney General since 2017. She was an Associate at Arnold & Porter LLP from 2007 to 2017. Welchans earned a Juris Doctor degree from the University of California, Davis. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $185,004. Welchans is a Democrat.

IN THE NEWS

RCRC press releases and related news clips about RCRC and our member counties. Please note that a subscription may be required to read some external publications.

 

California’s Plan to Close the Digital Divide Hits Industry Roadblocks – Capital & Main

California is in the planning process for the rollout of $6 billion in funding, dedicated last year, to closing the digital divide throughout the state. Yet proposed bills could favor industry providers and hinder efforts of local governments to connect their underserved communities. RCRC's Tracy Rhine is featured discussing this issue in Capital & Main.

 

Newsom plans to keep lights on in CA — with fossil fuels  – Los Angeles Times

RCRC’s concern and opposition to an energy package before the California Legislature that would give the state Energy Commission sole control over the siting of clean-energy facilities, is noted in this article from the Los Angeles Times. 

 

What They Are Saying: The Save Our Sequoias Act - Committee on Natural Resources Republican Office – House Committee On Natural Resources 

RCRC’s Staci Heaton is quoted in this press release from the House Committee on Natural Resources emphasizing the importance of the proposed Save Our Sequoias Act to help preserve these trees and reduce the risk of destructive wildfires in and around Giant Sequoia groves.

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Information related to the current status of legislation impacting California’s rural counties.

 

AB 522   (Fong)   Forestry: Forest Fire Prevention Exemption.  The Z’berg-Nejedly Forest Practice Act of 1973 authorizes the State Board of Forestry and Fire Protection to exempt specific forest management activities, including the harvesting of trees for the purpose of reducing the rate of fire spread, and duration, intensity, fuel ignitability, or ignition of tree crowns, known as the Forest Fire Prevention Exemption. Assembly Bill 522 extends the sunset of the Forest Fire Prevention Exemption to January 1, 2026 to aid forest landowners with wildfire prevention activities.   Location: Senate Appropriations   Status: 6/28/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 5. Noes 0.) (June 28). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Support   Staff:  Staci (1)

AB 1001   (Garcia, Cristina)   Environment: mitigation measures for air quality impacts: environmental justice.   Modifies the California Environmental Quality Act by: 1) Requiring air quality impacts to a disadvantaged community to be mitigated in that community; 2) Requiring local agencies to give consideration to the principles of environmental justice by ensuring the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of people of all races, cultures, incomes, and national origins. Location: Senate Environmental Quality   Status: 6/14/2022-In committee: Set, second hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.   Position:   Oppose  Staff:  John (1)

AB 1078   (Patterson)   Energy: building standards: photovoltaic requirements.   Exempts residential buildings damaged or destroyed in a disaster during the 2020 calendar year from having to install solar energy systems under the California Energy Commission’s recently adopted building requirements.   Location: Senate Third Reading   Status: 6/21/2022-Read second time. Ordered to third reading.   Position:   Support   Staff:  John (1)

AB 1154   (Patterson)   California Environmental Quality Act: exemption: egress route projects: fire safety.   Exempts from the California Environmental Quality Act secondary egress route projects undertaken by a public agency for a subdivision in a high fire threat area that was evaluated by the Board of Forestry.  Location: Senate Appropriations   Status: 6/23/2022-In committee: Hearing postponed by committee.   Position:   Sponsor   Staff:  John (1)

AB 1249   (Gallagher)   Income taxes: gross income exclusions: wildfires.     Location: Senate Appropriations Suspense File   Status: 6/13/2022-In committee: Referred to suspense file.   Position:   Support   Staff:  Staci (1)

AB 1434   (Friedman)   Urban water use objectives: indoor residential water use.     Location: Assembly Dead   Status: 2/1/2022-From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.   Position:   Concerns   Staff:  Sidd (1)

AB 1608   (Gipson)   County officers: consolidation of offices.   AB 1608 would remove county authority to combine the duties of the Sheriff with the duties of the Coroner. The bill appears to require counties with a combined Sheriff-Coroner function to either combine the Coroner with another authorized elected office, transition to a standalone elected Coroner, or replace the Coroner model with a Medical Examiner office.   Location: Senate Third Reading   Status: 6/30/2022-Read second time and amended. Ordered to third reading.   Position:   Oppose Unless Amended   Staff:  Sarah (1)

AB 1642   (Salas)   California Environmental Quality Act: water system well and domestic well projects: exemption.   Exempts from CEQA, vital projects to prevent or mitigate failure of a well that would leave residents without an adequate supply of drinking water. This exemption only applies to those wells in areas designated by the State Water Resources Control Board as being at high risk or medium risk in the state’s annual Drinking Water Needs Assessment.   Location: Senate Appropriations   Status: 6/30/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Support   Staff:  John (1)

AB 1644   (Flora)   Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund: California Jobs Plan Act of 2021.   The California Jobs Plan Act of 2021 requires the state board to work with the Labor and Workforce Development Agency to update, by July 1, 2025, Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund funding guidelines for administering agencies to ensure that all applicants to grant programs funded by the fund meet specified standards, including fair and responsible employer standards and inclusive procurement policies, as provided. Existing law exempts from these standards applicants for certain types of projects. This bill would exempt applicants for projects for healthy forest and fire prevention programs and projects, and the completion of prescribed fire and other fuel reduction projects from these standards.   Location: Senate Appropriations   Status: 6/21/2022-In committee: Hearing postponed by committee. From committee chair, with author's amendments: Amend, and re-refer to committee. Read second time, amended, and re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Support   Staff:  Staci (1)

AB 1696   (Lee)   Elections: nonpartisan candidates’ party preference.   Current constitutional and statutory law prohibits including the party preference of a candidate for nonpartisan office, defined as any judicial, school, county, or municipal office, including the Superintendent of Public Instruction, on the ballot for that office. This bill would require the ballot for the above offices, except for judicial offices, to contain the candidate’s party preference or, if applicable, lack of party preference.   Location: Assembly Dead   Status: 4/29/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(5). (Last location was ELECTIONS on 3/10/2022)   Position: Oppose   Staff:  Sarah (1)

AB 1717   (Aguiar-Curry)   Public works: definition.   Assembly Bill 1717 requires prevailing wage to be paid for public works projects funded by public dollars related to community wildfire prevention, vegetation management and fuels treatment.   Location: Senate Appropriations Suspense File   Status: 6/27/2022-In committee: Referred to suspense file.   Position:   Oppose   Staff:  Staci (1)

AB 1757   (Haney)   Groundwater sustainability agency.     Location: Senate Natural Resources and Water   Status: 6/1/2022-Referred to Com. on N.R. & W.   Staff:  Sidd (1)

AB 1778   (Garcia, Cristina)   State transportation funding: freeway projects: poverty and pollution: Department of Transportation.   Would require Caltrans to review highway expansion projects in areas of concern identified by the Healthy Places Index (a non-state generated index of localities affected by certain environmental impacts), and would preclude state funding in areas that fall within the bottom 50th percentile of that index.   Location: Senate Transportation   Status: 6/29/2022-In committee: Set, first hearing. Failed passage.   Position:   Watch   Staff:  Sidd (1)

AB 1784   (Smith)   Water Quality, Supply, and Infrastructure Improvement Act of 2014: groundwater sustainability projects: grants and loans.      Location: Assembly Dead   Status: 5/6/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(6). (Last location was A. PRINT on 2/3/2022)    Staff:  Sidd (1)

AB 1851   (Rivas, Robert )   Public works: prevailing wage: hauling.     Location: Senate Appropriations   Status: 6/22/2022-In committee: Hearing postponed by committee.   Position:   Watch   Staff:  John (1)

AB 1879   (Mathis)   California regional water quality control boards: unfounded or frivolous complaints.     Location: Senate Appropriations   Status: 6/30/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.    Staff:  Sidd (1)

AB 1906   (Stone)   Voluntary stream restoration: property owner liability: indemnification: claims.     Location: Senate Appropriations Suspense File   Status: 6/20/2022-In committee: Referred to suspense file.    Staff:  Sidd (1)

AB 1931   (Rivas, Luz)   Community water systems: lead service lines.     Location: Senate Appropriations   Status: 6/30/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.    Staff:  Sidd (1)

AB 1944   (Lee)   Local government: open and public meetings.   AB 1944 would authorize members of local legislative bodies to teleconference from a remote location without making the address of that location public. Additionally, the bill requires that – for those local agencies that elect to use teleconferencing for its legislative body meetings – a video stream is made available to members of the public, including an opportunity to provide public comment via telephone or videoconference option.   Location: Senate Gov. & F.   Status: 6/22/2022-In committee: Set, first hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author. In committee: Hearing postponed by committee.   Position:   Support   Staff:  Sarah (1)

AB 1953   (Maienschein)   Drinking water: accessible water bottle refill stations.     Location: Assembly Dead   Status: 5/20/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(8). (Last location was A. APPR. SUSPENSE FILE on 4/27/2022)   Position:   Oppose   Staff:  Sidd (1)

AB 1985   (Rivas, Robert )   Organic waste: recovered organic waste product procurement targets.     Location: Senate Appropriations   Status: 6/30/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Support   Staff:  John (1)

AB 2081   (Garcia, Eduardo)   Municipal water districts: water service: Indian lands.     Location: Senate Third Reading   Status: 6/21/2022-Read second time. Ordered to third reading.    Staff:  Sidd (1)

AB 2201   (Bennett)   Groundwater sustainability agency: groundwater extraction permit: verification.   This bill would prohibit a county, city, or any other water well permitting agency from approving a permit for a new groundwater well or for an alteration to an existing well in a basin subject to the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act and classified as medium- or high-priority unless it obtains a written verification, from the groundwater sustainability agency that manages the basin that, among other things, the extraction by the proposed well is consistent with any sustainable groundwater management program established in any applicable groundwater sustainability plan adopted by that groundwater sustainability agency or an alternate plan approved or under review by the Department of Water Resources.   Location: Senate Appropriations   Status: 6/30/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 3. Noes 1.) (June 29). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Oppose   Staff:  Sidd (1)

AB 2208   (Kalra)   Fluorescent lamps: sale and distribution: prohibition.     Location: Senate Second Reading   Status: 6/30/2022-Read third time and amended. Ordered to second reading.   Position:   Watch   Staff:  John (1)

AB 2237   (Friedman)   Transportation planning: regional transportation improvement plan: sustainable communities strategies: alternative planning strategy: state transportation funding.   This bill would require that those projects and programs included in each regional transportation improvement program also be consistent with the most recently prepared sustainable communities strategy of the regional transportation planning agency or county transportation commission, or, if applicable, the alternative planning strategy, and state and federal air quality standards. The bill would prohibit funds collected from any local transportation tax measure passed on or after January 1, 2023, from being spent until the transportation projects or programs to be funded by the tax measure are included in the most recently adopted sustainable communities strategy of the applicable regional transportation planning agency or county transportation commission or, if applicable, the alternative planning strategy. The bill would presumably extend the requirement that RTPAs and other local non-metropolitan transportation agencies develop a sustainable communities strategy or alternative planning strategy.   Location: Senate Transportation   Status: 6/16/2022-Re-referred to Com. on TRANS.   Position:   Oppose   Staff:  Sidd (1)

AB 2258   (Wood)   Local government: wildfire safety improvements.     Location: Assembly Dead   Status: 5/6/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(6). (Last location was A. B. & F. on 4/20/2022)   Position:   Pending   Staff:  John (1)

AB 2374   (Bauer-Kahan)   Crimes against public health and safety: illegal dumping.   Increases the maximum fine for the dumping of commercial quantities of waste by a business that employs more than 10 employees from $3,000 to $5,000 for the first conviction, from $6,000 to $10,000 for the second conviction, and from $10,000 to $20,000 for the third and any subsequent convictions. Clarifies that the dumping of commercial quantities of waste includes waste dumped on another person's residential property.   Location: Senate Third Reading   Status: 6/28/2022-Read second time. Ordered to third reading.   Position:   Support   Staff:  John (1)

AB 2419   (Bryan)   Environmental justice: federal Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act: Justice40 Advisory Committee.   This bill would require a minimum of 40% of funds received by the state under the federal Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act to be allocated to projects that provide direct benefits to disadvantaged communities as designated by the CalEnviroScreen Tool and a minimum of an additional 10% be allocated for projects that provide direct benefits to low-income households and low-income communities, as provided. The bill would create a California Justice40 Advisory Committee to advise state agencies on administration of the funds.   Location: Senate Appropriations   Status: 6/29/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 9. Noes 3.) (June 28). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Concerns   Staff:  Staci (1)

AB 2440   (Irwin)   Responsible Battery Recycling Act of 2022.     Location: Senate Appropriations   Status: 6/29/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 9. Noes 1.) (June 28). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Support   Staff:  John (1)

AB 2449   (Rubio, Blanca)   Open meetings: local agencies: teleconferences.   AB 2449 would authorize remote participation in local public meetings if at least a quorum of the members of the legislative body participates in person from a location clearly identified on the agenda that is also open to the public and situated within the boundaries of the local agencies. In order to do so, the local agency must appropriately post agendas, members of the legislative body attending the meeting by teleconference must participate in both audio and video formats, and members of the public must have call-in and internet-based access for attending and participating in the meetings.   Location: Senate Appropriations   Status: 6/30/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Oppose Unless Amended   Staff:  Sarah (1)

AB 2451   (Wood)   State Water Resources Control Board: drought planning.     Location: Senate Appropriations   Status: 6/23/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.    Staff:  Sidd (1)

AB 2454   (Jones-Sawyer)   Public contracts: protests: joint labor-management committee.     Location: Senate Governmental Organization   Status: 6/23/2022-In committee: Set, first hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.   Position:   Pending   Staff:  Sarah (1)

AB 2481   (Smith)   Household hazardous waste: facilities: transportation and acceptance.   Makes several changes to laws related to transportation of household hazardous waste (HHW) and operation of household hazardous waste collection facilities (HHWCFs). AB 2481 is intended to clarify and resolve ambiguities in existing law while reducing administrative and financial burdens on local governments that administer HHWCFs; provide flexibility for operation of local HHWCFs; and facilitate proper disposal of hazardous waste.   Location: Senate Third Reading   Status: 6/29/2022-Read second time. Ordered to third reading.   Position:   Sponsor   Staff:  John (1)

AB 2505   (Gray)   Water theft: irrigation districts.     Location: Assembly Chaptered   Status: 6/20/2022-Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 23, Statutes of 2022.    Staff:  Sidd (1)

AB 2647   (Levine)   Local government: open meetings.   This measure would clarify that writings distributed to the majority of a local legislative body less than 72 hours before a meeting can be posted online to satisfy the Brown Act if physical copies are made available for public inspection at the beginning of the next regular business day at a public office or designated location.   Location: Senate Gov. & F.   Status: 6/30/2022-From committee: Amend, and do pass as amended. (Ayes 5. Noes 0.) (June 29).   Position:   Support   Staff:  Sarah (1)

AB 2677   (Gabriel)   Information Practices Act of 1977.   Would remove the exemption of local agencies from the Act, which deals with the collection, storage, and disclosure of personal information.   Location: Senate Appropriations   Status: 6/30/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Neutral   Staff:  Sarah (1)

AB 2878   (Aguiar-Curry)   Forest Biomass Waste Utilization Program.     Location: Senate Appropriations   Status: 6/30/2022-From committee: Amend, and do pass as amended and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 12. Noes 0.) (June 27).   Position:   Sponsor   Staff:  John (1)

ACA 1   (Aguiar-Curry)   Local government financing: affordable housing and public infrastructure: voter approval.    ACA 1 would lower the vote threshold to 55 percent for approval of local bonded-indebtedness and specially dedicated taxes imposed for specified uses.   Location: Assembly Local Government   Status: 4/22/2021-Referred to Coms. on L. GOV. and APPR.   Position:   Support   Staff:  Tracy (1)

ACA 13   (Mathis)   Water infrastructure projects: minimum funding requirement and general obligation bonds.     Location: Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife   Status: 4/7/2022-Referred to Coms. on W.,P., & W. and NAT. RES.    Staff:  Sidd (1)

AJR 5   (Rivas, Luz)   Wild free-roaming horses and burros: protection: roundup moratorium.   AJR 5 would urge the federal government to declare a moratorium on all further wild horse and burro round-ups and would urge the United States Bureau of Land Management and the United States Forest Service to introduce and support populations in areas of California where wild horses and burros were historically present.   Location: Senate Natural Resources and Water   Status: 8/25/2021-Referred to Com. on N.R. & W.   Position:   Oppose   Staff:  Sidd (1)

SB 12   (McGuire)   Local government: planning and zoning: wildfires.   Senate Bill 12 requires that the Office of Planning and Research, among other things, coordinate with appropriate entities, including state, regional, or local agencies, to establish a clearinghouse for climate adaptation information for use by state, regional, and local entities, as provided. This bill would require the safety element, upon the next revision of the housing element or the hazard mitigation plan, on or after July 1, 2024, whichever occurs first.   Location: Assembly Housing and Community Development   Status: 6/15/2022-June 15 set for first hearing canceled at the request of author.   Position:   Pending   Staff:  Tracy (1)

SB 33   (Cortese)   California Environmental Quality Act: judicial and administrative proceedings: limitations.   For individuals who request to be notified any time CEQA notices are filed, requires a local agency to also notify that individual any time those notices are amended. Allows an individual to request CEQA notifications by e-mail. Tolls CEQA statutes of limitations until all individuals requesting notifications are mailed or e-mailed such notifications.   Location: Assembly Natural Resources   Status: 6/9/2022-Re-referred to Coms. on NAT. RES. and JUD. From committee with author's amendments. Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on NAT. RES.   Position:   Oppose   Staff:  John (1)

SB 37   (Cortese)   Contaminated Site Cleanup and Safety Act.   Senate Bill 37 eliminates the ability to use a “common sense exemption” under the California Environmental Quality Act for any projects undertaken at over 40,000 sites throughout the state that appear on the Cortese List of currently or formerly contaminated properties. Instead allows specified types of projects to use either a statutory or categorical CEQA exemption is certain circumstances are met   Location: Assembly 2 year   Status: 9/10/2021-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(a)(15). (Last location was INACTIVE FILE on 9/8/2021)(May be acted upon Jan 2022)   Position:   Neutral   Staff:  John (1)

SB 38   (Wieckowski)   Beverage containers.   Replaces the existing Beverage Container Recycling Program (Bottle Bill) with a new recycling program administered by beverage container manufacturers and increases the CRV from $0.05 to $0.10 per container if the state fails to achieve specified recycling rates. Repeals the $10.5 million annually set aside for payments to cities and counties to address recycling and litter.   Location: Assembly Appropriations   Status: 6/27/2022-VOTE: Do pass as amended and be re-referred to the Committee on [Appropriations] (PASS)   Position:   Oppose Unless Amended   Staff:  John (1)

SB 54   (Allen)   Solid waste: reporting, packaging, and plastic food service ware.   SB 54 requires manufactures of single-use, disposable packaging and food service ware to ensure that those products sold, distributed, or imported into the state are either recyclable or compostable.   Location: Senate Chaptered   Status: 6/30/2022-Signed by the Governor   Position:   Support   Staff:  John (1)

SB 213   (Cortese)   Workers’ compensation: hospital employees.     Location: Assembly Insurance   Status: 6/22/2022-June 22 set for first hearing. Held in committee without recommendation.   Position:   Oppose   Staff:  Sarah (1)

SB 359   (Caballero)   Climate change: Resilient Merced County Incentive Pilot Program.   Senate Bill 359 requires the Department of Conservation to develop and implement the Resilient Merced County Incentive Pilot Program to assist the County of Merced to develop and adopt a climate action plan through the use of a scenario-planning tool developed by the department and provide financial assistance to private landowners in implementing activities resulting from the use of the scenario-planning tool set forth in the adopted climate action plan.   Location: Senate Dead   Status: 2/1/2022-Returned to Secretary of Senate pursuant to Joint Rule 56.   Position:   Pending   Staff:  Sidd (1)

SB 396   (Bradford)   Forestry: electrical transmission or distribution lines: clearances: notice and opportunity to be heard.     Location: Assembly Third Reading   Status: 6/30/2022-Read third time and amended. Ordered to third reading.   Position:   Oppose   Staff:  John (1)

SB 463   (Dahle)   Water: landowner or water right holder right to modify, repair, or replace jointly used conduits.     Location: Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife   Status: 6/29/2022-June 28 set for final hearing. Failed passage in committee. (Ayes 5. Noes 4.)    Staff:  Sidd (1)

SB 832   (Dodd)   Water rights: measurement of diversion.     Location: Senate Dead   Status: 5/20/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(8). (Last location was S. APPR. SUSPENSE FILE on 4/25/2022)   Position:   Watch   Staff:  Sidd (1)

SB 833   (Dodd)   Community Energy Resilience Act of 2022.   Requires the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission to develop and implement a grant program for local governments to develop community energy resilience plans.   Location: Assembly Appropriations   Status: 6/30/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Support   Staff:  John (1)

SB 884   (McGuire)   Electricity: expedited utility distribution infrastructure undergrounding program.     Location: Assembly Appropriations   Status: 6/27/2022-June 27 hearing postponed by committee. Re-referred to Com. on APPR. pursuant to Assembly Rule 96.   Position:   Watch   Staff:  John (1)

SB 915   (Min)   Firearms: state property.   SB 915, which would prohibit the sale of firearms on any state- or county-owned property, including fairgrounds from holding gun shows and, as a result, erode the revenue stream that would be derived from legal gun shows on these premises.   Location: Senate Enrollment   Status: 6/29/2022-Assembly amendments concurred in. (Ayes 25. Noes 8.) Ordered to engrossing and enrolling.   Position:   Oppose   Staff:  Sarah (1)

SB 926   (Dodd)   Prescribed Fire Liability Pilot Program: Prescribed Fire Claims Fund.     Location: Assembly Appropriations   Status: 6/28/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. with recommendation: To consent calendar. (Ayes 11. Noes 0.) (June 28). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Support   Staff:  Staci (1)

SB 931   (Leyva)   Deterring union membership: violations.   Authorizes PERB claim alleging employer deterred or discouraged union membership, up to $100,000 fine ($1,000 per employee impacted) and attorney’s fees for employee organization.   Location: Assembly Appropriations   Status: 6/22/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 5. Noes 2.) (June 22). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Oppose Unless Amended   Staff:  Sarah (1)

SB 938   (Hertzberg)   The Cortese-Knox-Hertzberg Local Government Reorganization Act of 2000: protest proceedings: procedural consolidation.     Location: Senate Enrolled   Status: 6/30/2022-Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 12 p.m.   Position:   Support   Staff:  Sarah (1)

SB 1012   (Glazer)   State parks: open fires.     Location: Assembly Appropriations   Status: 6/28/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 14. Noes 0.) (June 28). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Support   Staff:  Staci (1)

SB 1013   (Atkins)   Beverage container recycling: reports: electronic submittal: wine and distilled spirits.   Expands the state's Beverage Container Recycling Program, for which consumers must pay a $0.05 or $0.10/container deposit, to wine and distilled spirits.   Location: Assembly Appropriations   Status: 6/28/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. with recommendation: To consent calendar. (Ayes 10. Noes 0.) (June 27). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Watch   Staff:  John (1)

SB 1044   (Durazo)   Employers: state of emergency or emergency condition: retaliation.   SB 1044 would prohibit an employer from taking or threatening any adverse action against any employee for refusing to report to, or leaving, a workplace because the employee feels unsafe due to a state of emergency or an emergency condition, and (2) permit employees to access their mobile device or other communications device.   Location: Assembly Appropriations   Status: 6/29/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Oppose   Staff:  Sarah (1)

SB 1100   (Cortese)   Open meetings: orderly conduct.   SB 1100 would clarify the rules around when individuals can be removed for willfully interrupting a meeting.   Location: Assembly Third Reading   Status: 6/22/2022-Read second time. Ordered to third reading.   Position:   Neutral   Staff:  Sarah (1)

SB 1109   (Caballero)   California Renewables Portfolio Standard Program: bioenergy projects.   Extends SB 901 BioRAM biomass energy facility contracts by an additional five years. Requires any incremental procurement of electricity products from bioenergy resources by a new BioRAM contract or contract extension of 10 years or longer in duration to be from a resource that meets emission limits equivalent to, or more stringent than, the best available retrofit control technology determined at the time of procurement.   Location: Assembly Appropriations   Status: 6/30/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Support   Staff:  John (1)

SB 1127   (Atkins)   Workers’ compensation: liability presumptions.   SB 1127 proposes to shorten the time provided for employers to investigate claims from 90 to 30 days for any claim covered by a presumption statute, and 60 days for all other claims. The bill proposes new and unprecedented penalties all claims covered by presumption statutes up to $100,000.   Location: Assembly Appropriations   Status: 6/22/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 10. Noes 2.) (June 22). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Oppose   Staff:  Sarah (1)

SB 1186   (Wiener)   Medicinal Cannabis Patients’ Right of Access Act.   SB 1186 undermines the intent of MAUCRSA by (1) eliminating a local jurisdiction's ability to prohibit medical cannabis retail activities, regardless of the needs or conditions in the jurisdiction, and (2) restricting the ability for the large number of jurisdictions that permit and regulate cannabis retailers to set appropriate local regulations which are developed in a public process.   Location: Assembly Appropriations   Status: 6/29/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Oppose   Staff:  Sarah (1)

SB 1215   (Newman)   Electronic Waste Recycling Act of 2003: covered battery-embedded products.     Location: Assembly Appropriations   Status: 6/30/2022-From committee: Do pass as amended and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 9. Noes 1.) (June 27).   Position:   Support   Staff:  John (1)

SB 1220   (Hurtado)   Sustainable Groundwater Management Act: groundwater sustainability plans.     Location: Senate Dead   Status: 5/6/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(6). (Last location was S. N.R. & W. on 3/2/2022)    Staff:  Sidd (1)

SB 1256   (Wieckowski)   Waste management: disposable propane cylinders.     Location: Assembly Third Reading   Status: 6/30/2022-Read second time. Ordered to third reading.   Position:   Watch   Staff:  John (1)

SB 1266   (Borgeas)   Income taxes: credits: designated wildfire zones.   Provides a tax credit of 50 percent of the amount paid, up to $3,500, for the purchase of a backup power generator ($5,000 for purchase of a solar battery) for use in a residence or by a small business located in a very high fire hazard severity zone.   Location: Assembly Revenue and Taxation   Status: 6/20/2022-June 20 hearing: Heard for testimony only.   Position:   Support   Staff:  John (1)

SB 1326   (Caballero)   Cannabis: interstate agreements.   SB 1326 would allow the cross jurisdictional import and export to other states, of cannabis and cannabis products by authorizing the Governor to enter into an agreement to provide lawful interstate commerce. SB 1326 requires the agreement to include public health, safety, and labeling standards, a system to regulate and track cannabis items, collection of applicable taxes, and that out of state cannabis items delivered to California be tested, packaged, and labeled in compliance with California state law.   Location: Assembly Appropriations   Status: 6/15/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Sponsor   Staff:  Sarah (1)

SB 1338   (Umberg)   Community Assistance, Recovery, and Empowerment (CARE) Court Program.   SB 1338 reflects Governor Newsom’s vison for creating a new civil court process to reach and treat individuals living with untreated schizophrenia spectrum and psychiatric disorders. These new Community Assistance, Recovery, and Empowerment (CARE) Courts would work with public defenders, county behavioral health, and a new class of trained “supporters” to assist individuals with treatment, medication, and housing. CARE Courts require significant engagement and resources from counties.   Location: Assembly Appropriations   Status: 6/30/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.   Position:   Concerns   Staff:  Sarah (1)

SB 1404   (Stern)   California Environmental Quality Act: oak woodlands.   Would have established a statewide threshold of significance for the removal of oak trees under CEQA and eliminated an important safe harbor under which a project’s implementation of locally-adopted mitigation measures is deemed to satisfy CEQA’s requirements related to the project’s effects on oaks and oak woodlands.   Location: Senate Dead   Status: 5/20/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(8). (Last location was S. APPR. SUSPENSE FILE on 5/9/2022)   Position:   Oppose   Staff:  John (1)

SB 1410   (Caballero)   California Environmental Quality Act: transportation impacts.     Location: Assembly Appropriations Suspense File   Status: 6/29/2022-June 29 set for first hearing. Placed on suspense file.   Position:   Support   Staff:  John (1)

SB 1426   (Caballero)   Cannabis: water pollution crimes.   Would make it a misdemeanor or felony to plant, cultivate, harvest, dry, or process more than 50 living cannabis plants, or any part thereof, and where that activity involves theft of groundwater, unauthorized tapping into a water conveyance or storage infrastructure, digging an unpermitted, illegal well, or the pollution of groundwater, as specified. This bill would also clarify that causing substantial environmental harm to public resources includes groundwater.   Location: Senate Appropriations Suspense File   Status: 5/19/2022-May 19 hearing: Held in committee and under submission.   Position:   Support   Staff:  Sarah (1)