How are the Board of Directors selected?
RCRC Board of Director Delegates and Alternates are selected at the individual county level.  Each year, each county selects a Delegate and Alternate to represent their interests on the Board.

How is RCRC different from the California State Association of Counties (CSAC)?
RCRC represents the unique interests of its rural membership.  The issues impacting these counties are often different from the issues that CSAC advocates on behalf of, as they represent a less specific membership.

Where can I find information on attending and/or sponsoring the RCRC Annual Meeting?
Information on the RCRC Annual Meeting is posted online prior to the event.  However, to request sponsorship information in advance, email info@rcrcnet.org.

Where can I go to learn more about RCRC’s position/policy on specific legislative and regulatory issues?
Each year, the RCRC Board of Directors adopts a set of Policy Principles that guide legislative and regulatory advocacy efforts for the organization.  The current RCRC Policy Principles document can be accessed here.  Additionally, RCRC takes a formal position on many individual pieces of legislation and regulatory proposals every year, based upon these Principles. 

How can I get updates on Legislative/Budget Issues?
The best way to stay informed on legislative and regulatory issues impacting California’s rural counties is to sign up for the RCRC e-newsletter, the Barbed Wire.  To sign up for the Barbed Wire, click here, or email info@rcrcnet.org.

What are the current issues impacting rural counties?
To learn about some of the current issues impacting rural counties, click here.

Are the RCRC Board of Directors meetings streamed on the RCRC website?
RCRC Board Meetings are not live streamed on the RCRC website, or available for call-in, but are open to the public.

Who attends the RCRC Board of Directors meetings?
The RCRC Board of Directors convenes seven times annually, represented by a duly-elected County Supervisor from each member county.  The RCRC Board of Directors meetings are open to the public, and attendance often includes other County Supervisors, County Administrators, and Staff.

Who serves on the Board of Directors?
The RCRC Board of Directors is comprised of an elected member of the County Board of Supervisors from each of its thirty-five member counties.  Each county has a board delegate and a board alternate.  Details about the RCRC Board of Directors can be accessed here.

What are the benefits to being a member of RCRC?
RCRC champions policies on behalf of rural counties.  Rural counties face unique challenges when putting federal and state policies into effect.  The greater distances, lower population densities, and geographic diversity of RCRC's thirty-five member counties create obstacles not faced by their more urban or suburban counterparts. For those reasons, "one-size-fits-all" policies don't work, especially when the "size" typically is a more metropolitan model.  Membership in RCRC provides counties with a collective voice, strengthening the message, credibility, and reach of the unique issues faced by rural counties.

What is the process for becoming a member?
Counties interested in joining RCRC simply need to email info@rcrcnet.org requesting further information about membership. Once the potential member receives approval from their Board of Supervisors to move forward, the RCRC membership takes their request to a vote.

Where can I find information about joining RCRC?
To receive information about joining RCRC, email info@rcrcnet.org.

How can I get on the distribution list for the RCRC e-newsletter, the Barbed Wire?
To sign up for the Barbed Wire, click here, or email info@rcrcnet.org.

How much are the RCRC membership dues?
RCRC membership dues are based upon member county population, with a minimum and maximum annual rate.

What is the organizational structure of RCRC?
To learn about RCRC's organizational structure, click here.

What exactly does RCRC do?
RCRC works with its member counties to advocate on behalf of rural issues in the legislative and regulatory arenas at both the state and federal level. RCRC represents the rural county perspective on a myriad of issues such as land use, water and natural resources, housing, transportation, wildfire protection policies, and health and human services, among others.  The core of RCRC’s mission is to improve the ability of small, rural California county government to provide services by reducing the burden of state and federal mandates and promoting a greater understanding among policy makers about the unique challenges that face California's small population counties.

What is the mission of RCRC?
The Rural County Representatives of California is dedicated to representing the collective unique interests of its membership, providing legislative and regulatory representation at the State and Federal levels, and providing responsible services for its members to enhance and protect the quality of life in rural California counties.

The core of RCRC’s mission is to improve the ability of small, rural California county government to provide services by reducing the burden of state and federal mandates and promoting a greater understanding among policy makers about the unique challenges that face California's small and remote counties.

How many member counties are there?
RCRC advocates on behalf of thirty-five member counties, representing more than half of the state’s total number of counties (58).

How does RCRC define a county as rural?
RCRC advocates on behalf of the collective unique interests of its membership, consisting of California’s larger geographical and lower population counties.  Our membership represents more than half (50.55 percent) of California’s 155,779.21 square miles, and nearly 1 in 12 Californians reside within our member counties.

What is a county?
A county is a geographical region of a state, used for administrative and other purposes, providing local government services.  RCRC represents thirty-five of California’s 58 counties.